Sedition from Bondage

The key of captivity

Lies in the ability of the mind

Break the cycle of learned helplessness

Your freedom you will find

The fundamentals of illusion

Breed attachment and pain

When trapped in the problem

The solution we search for is in vain

Become the escape artist

Study the trap you are in

Visualize the possibilities

Become the Houdini and begin

The levels and degrees of servitude

We levy or subjugate

We mold our reality

Much of what we create

What is the sound of one hand clapping?

Teacher enticing student to see

Constructs in our minds

Can also be just folly

The statement below is false

The statement above is true

A liars paradox

Another Waterloo

The duck or the rabbit?

Wittgenstein would ask

Which will give way?

Which one will last?

The Zen koan, the Greek paradox, and Wittgenstein

All demonstrate a vantage point to see

Problems of human reasoning

All contingent on how we will be

DCG

Your Bona Fides should Represent

We may find out as children

When parents can lead us astray

They tell us how the world works

Until we find out the error of their ways

I am told many things about the world

With little evidence, faulty reasoning and bias not far behind

Despite ignorance and poor role modeling

We must still search for a truth that we can find

We are an agency in the population

There are many challenges we meet with resistance

Our own accounting

Our own insistence

If you speak out and criticize

Your bona fides should represent

Something to backup your claims

Something to ground your intent

Too many times we are not cogent

Not in thought, not in mind

Often we may say things

But oh so maligned

DCG

The Skeptic in me

In past days I remember conversations I’ve held with friends about topics that held my attention.  I once was instructed by a friend that there is no meaning when we ask the “why” questions about academic psychological inquiries.  I understood the implications of this analysis, but the philosopher in me continues to ask the “why” questions even to this day.  Mind you, this was back in the early nineteen-eighties when I was a psychology student and I seemed to question everything.  I was thirsty for knowledge, and my studies directed me in paradigms that for me demanded further clarification.  My friend whom had asserted his position was far more advanced in this field than I was, yet I seemed to be driven by a beat to a different drummer.

No matter what paradigmatic psychological school of thought you tend to follow, the basic questions I asked went beyond the psychological realm.  Thus I entered into the realm of philosophy when I started to ask these types of questions.  Even when I was a psychology student, the philosopher in me still thrived years before I decided to double my major in both disciplines.

I can’t really remember the exact topics at the time of this conversation, but I still remember the response of my friend to my questioning these matters that were of interest to me.  Maybe this is the reason I decided to also major in Philosophy.  Maybe this is also the beginning of the Skeptic in me.

Ironically I consider myself gravitating to the pragmatic philosophies of the world, yet I am still intrigued by many other differing types of philosophical thought.  What stirs up a person to question their reality?  Why do people become skeptical?  Perhaps it is because they find conflicting information in what they see, read, and are told to believe as conditions they should except?  Is it that there are fundamental issues with these assertions that contradict their notions of reliability?

However the rubber meets the road, we are still vaulted forward into discovery by our very nature of asking questions, and this is how many approach to learn about their world; by asking questions.  I do not know all of the reasons that led me to become inquisitive.  I only know that I am that way.  I am not always inclined to act in this way, yet much of my being has an affinity with acting in this way.

There are many ancient skeptical schools of philosophy.  Foundations of these schools come from India, Zen Buddhist, Chinese, and Greek schools, as well as the foundations from later Western schools of thought expressed by David Hume, René Descartes, and Immanuel Kant.  I do not draw on these schools directly into their epistemological constructions as my form of skepticism is tied closer to matters associated with social pragmatic implications.

Doubt can be a useful tool.  It is the basis for discovery into any assertion made.  When we are told what to believe with little evidence, we can either accept it, challenge it, or dismiss it.  I speak more of a way to diffuse opinion than to uncover the metaphysical and epistemological domains of human knowledge.  You may think it is preposterous to live by such examinations, but sometimes it can help us achieve a better understanding of our place in this world.

I must say that before I knew anything about Skepticism, it was in my nature to ask these questions despite my intellectual foundations.  Why did I ask them?  Because I received information that somehow needed further explanation to understand it than to simply accept it as it was received.  I was predisposed to question these types of questions.  If we look further into my history, and we have demonstrated that it was not an intellectual awakening that summoned this spawn of thought, than where will we find the genesis of my disposition?  Maybe the environment in which I was raised?

I was born into a family that did not quite understand the meaning of “intimacy.”  The struggle to impart any kind of a healthy world view and skill of becoming a successful person in relationships, were not the best of what my parents could offer.  My family had a difficult time just relating to one another my entire life, as with many families who face some of these intimacy issues.  As I matured, I withdrew into my own perceptions and observations about the world as it unfolded.  I was both the master and / or the slave upon which my beliefs conducted me into this brave new world.  I sense that that my family’s interactive behavior had ultimately led me on a lifelong quest to find some answers to the questions that has perplexed so many of us from time to time.  Due to the insatiable need that grew within me, questions began to emerge from a skepticism that was derived from the foundation of my family’s interactions and was conveyed through my own family experience.  I have always loved my family and wanted closer connections, but my skills to achieve this were not yet formed.

I think this was the impetus of my approach to the world as I became the person known as me.  The fundamental skeptical foundation that led me to question what I was told to see the world as it was by proxy of my family’s influence.  Moreover, I did on my own accord because the information I was receiving was not satisfying my sense of the world.  I had independent confirmation and differences of interpretation to how I encountered the world that was in direct conflict with what I was told.  Thus the philosopher in me expressed itself into the world.

Today I am still questioning, I am still drawn to asking questions we are told about the world we live in, but not from my family’s input, rather it is from the world at large: the powers that be!

Clearly there has never been such a push for a dystopian era in past decades then our current situation worldwide.  History has shown many such examples, yet we have not learned much from these as our push for a multicultural civilization is thrust upon us.  Today I question multiculturalism which I argue is what globalist’s want to achieve as opposed to a multi-ethnic community that has indisputably existed around the world without massive inharmonious complications given one factor: that the multi-ethnic communities adopt the ethical foundations of the land such as the American experiment of governance among other Western Democracies.

What say you?

 

 

A Pocketful of Tolerance and Heartache

An emotional cost is witnessed

The only return on the investment I made

‘Tis a pocketful of tolerance and heartache

‘Tis of this in which I have paid

I am not the ideal example

There is no pedestal for me

I try to live the best I can

But all I have to tell you is what I have to see

A struggle can be an opportunity

In struggle we can find our strengths

Sometimes the opportunity is lost

When we find too many imposing constraints

There are often unspoken assumptions

In the social presumptions we make

We tell ourselves that they are real

But we should test them to see if they are fake

How can we make sense out of the world?

We can’t even make sense out of our life

What is the cause of this frustration?

What is the cause of this strife?

Perhaps we take part in this deception

Perhaps we miscalculate our views

Place another one down the line of our query

Place another one in the back of the Que

Is there relativity in our observations?

Does the standard move from line to line?

Again from situation to situation?

Through the ethereal space or through those of us bound in time?

How do we decide this ethic?

Who gets to draw the lines?

How do we meet our standards?

When do we undermine?

DCG

At the End of the Day

So you think you’ve got it all figured out

You’ve taken all the classes

You’ve read all the books

Where does it leave you at the end of the day?

When your friends stop listening?

Are you angry? Were you led astray?

Why do you invest in this energy?

Are your neighbors alienated?

Are your children convinced?

Are their egos deflated and their transgressions rinsed?

Think you have the high moral ground?

Think you have the better view?

Better think again

There is always something new

The minute you think you have it right

The second you believe it’s true

Somebody else will break it up

Someone else will find some fault in you

God knows we try

God knows we want what’s right

God help us

Prideful children running blindly into the night

Don’t tread on me

Don’t make me concede

Don’t make me obey

Don’t make me Plead

I’m independent

Not into the group think

I think for myself

Am I on the brink?

So you think you’ve got it all figured out

You’ve taken all the classes

You’ve read all the books

Where does it leave you at the end of the day?

When your friends stop listening?

Are you angry? Were you led astray?

DCG

The Trial of Human Reason

Prologue

In the historical context of the Genesis story there are 48 verses that deal with the consequences of the first temptation and the exodus from Eden which St. Augustine refers as “The Original Sin”.  The questions I raise in a novel are the implications of such a story whereby my protagonist is “Human Reasoning”.

What is Satan’s Greatest Lie?

John 8:44

– You belong to your father, the devil, and you want to carry out your father’s desire. He was a murderer from the beginning, not holding to the truth, for there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks his native language, for he is a liar and the father of all lies.”

“Don’t lie to each other.” (Colossians 3:9)

Christians are in warfare against Satan. While it is true that Jesus defeated Satan on the cross, it is also true that Satan never ceases his attack on God’s People. In this warfare, let us look at five of Satan’s greatest lies he uses against people.

GREATEST LIE #1 – GOD WITHHOLDS GOOD THINGS FROM US

  • A. Genesis 3:4-5 –“‘You will not surely die, the serpent said to the woman. ‘For God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.’”
  • B. Satan tempts us to believe God’s goodness obligates Him to gratify our desires immediately, and when that does not happen, it is a sign that God does not care about us.
  • C. God’s plans are always for out best over the long haul, and not just for the immediate short-term.

GREATEST LIE #2 – TRUST IN THE DEITY OF SELF

  • A. Psalm 20:7– “Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the Lord our God.”
  • B. Satan always provides a list of alternatives to choose from in place of choosing to trust in God.
  1.  Humanism
  2.  Materialism . . . Things . . . Stuff
  3.  Denominational-ism . . . Religious beliefs and organizations that did not come from God.
  4.  Numbers . . . Satan tempts us to trust in numbers and not God’s provision.

1 Chronicles 21:1

– “Satan rose up against Israel and incited David to take a census of Israel.”

5. Self . . . Self-reliance.

a.  Satan wants us to fall victim to the lie of self-reliance.

Philippians 4:19

–“And my God will meet all your needs according to his glorious riches in Christ Jesus.”

b. God-reliance . . . Not self-reliance.

GREATEST LIE #3 – GOD’S PEOPLE WILL NEVER SUFFER

  • A. Matthew 16:22-23– “Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. ‘Never, Lord!’ he said. ‘This shall never happen to you!’Jesus turned and said to Peter, ‘Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; you do not have in mind the things of God, but the things of men.’”

B. Satan tempts us to believe nothing bad will ever happen to us as Christians. And, if something bad does happen, it is just a further sign that God is not all we believe Him to be.” Satan would have us believe that.

  • C. Satan’s lie sows self-pity that blooms into bitterness of heart.

1. How thankful we should be for the Book of Job.

2. Romans 8:28

– “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.”

GREATEST LIE #4 – MONEY BRINGS HAPPINESS

  • A. Matthew 4:8-9– “Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor. ‘All this I will give you,” he said, “if you will bow down and worship me.’”
  • B. Greed will take our eyes off God.
  • C. Listening to Satan will short-circuit God’s plan for us.

1. Malachi 3:10

– “Bring the whole tithe into the storehouse, that there may be food in my house. Test me in this,” says the LORD Almighty, “and see if I will not throw open the floodgates of heaven and pour out so much blessing that you will not have room enough for it.

2. God will provide things for us . . . But things will not provide God for us!

GREATEST LIE #5 – FORGIVENESS IS IMPOSSIBLE

  • A. Corinthians 2:7, 11– “Now instead, you ought to forgive and comfort him, so that he will not be overwhelmed by excessive sorrow.In order that Satan might not outwit us. For we are not unaware of his schemes.
  • B. Refusal to forgive invites bitterness into our hearts.
  • C. Unable to forgive divides people and kills fellowship.
  • D. The road to forgiveness begins with remembering how much we’ve been forgiven.
  • E. In order to reach Heaven, not only must we be forgiven by God . . . But we must also forgive others.

Mark 11:25-26

– “I tell you, whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours.

And when you stand praying, if you hold anything against anyone, forgive him, so that your Father in heaven may forgive you your sins.”

John 8:32

– “Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.”

resources to ponder:
http://www.ewtn.com/library/papaldoc/jp2tb3.htm
http://www.leighb.com/genesis.htm
https://global.oup.com/obso/focus/focus_on_genesis1/
http://www.michaelsheiser.com/TheNakedBible/HaselGen1ANE.pdf
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Da_Vinci_Code
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradise_Lost

 


The Trial of Human Reason

3:6   And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise, she took of the fruit thereof, and did eat, and gave also unto her husband with her; and he did eat.

 

Temptation in the garden

The seductive lies that are told

Forever turning us away

Now forever wearing the blindfold

How can it be?

We turned away and now rely on what is fallible

Breaking the covenant

To trust on oneself, is truth now intangible?

The serpent’s deception

A fools path for amity

Free will determines our fate

A masterstroke for calamity

If you were to believe

Evil does not exist

Another problem to consider

Another problem to dismiss

What do we value?

Philosophy and logic?

Are they our absolution?

Are they anagogic?

The argument for freedom

Comes in many different shades

Can we lay down a trump card?

Can we lay down our ace of spades?

Consider the reasons we argue?

Consider why we fight?

The need to know?

The need to be right?

Understanding is fundamental

Understanding is our largest drive

Where do we turn for answers?

Is it truth or is it contrived?

The trial of human reason

Forever in debate

Is this our undoing?

Is this our checkmate?


DCG

 

Eve, the apple and the serpent. Think upon this iconic triad.  The possibilities for involvement are multitudinous.:

 

 

The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven. ~John Milton:

 

The Sickness of Sanity

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The sickness of sanity

Is filling my head

The masters and keepers of servants cause dread

A psycho-war is upon us

A propaganda disease

To muster public opinion

And put us on our knees

Do not question authority

The constitution is dead

An old piece of paper

not needed they said

Believe them they tell us

Official documents don’t lie

Trust in me the serpent said

Kaa the snake said with his eyes

Attacking religion

Shaming the flag of the free

Destabilize the country

Point the finger

And blame it on greed

They poise to turn us on each other

They use a false logic and state

We are the subject’s

We don’t have a choice in our fate

The sickness of sanity

Is filling my head

The masters and keepers of servants cause dread

A psycho-war is upon us

A propaganda disease

To muster public opinion

And put us on our knees

For those who question 911

You have no voice

For those who may oppose us

A prison sentence will only be your choice

I stand against the docket

That condemns a free man

I stand against the agency

That rules against us and caters to a foreign land

You might think us to be ignorant

But what you don’t understand

We are the people

The people who are on to your plan

The politicians in your pocket

The media and that’s for sure

Try hard to misdirect us

Try as hard as they do, they are not pure

How will the century end?

How will the historians tally up?

On the take?

Or on the road for being morally bankrupt?

The power of one

Can change the day

The legacy of the plutocrats

Will lead us to embers and decay


DCG

 

Lost in Translation

The significance of experiencing contrast in our lives gives us a perspective that will remain auspicious in our memories.  The world is continually providing us with contrast as we are not omniscient beings, hence we cannot predict future events that we will eventually weather.  For the average person much of this is “lost in translation” and If we are observant than we may find that these experiences will awaken us to a multitude of foresight in the maturation of our humanity.  Many of us struggle and find that we neglect to learn from some of these enigmatic lessons that are poised within the span of our lives.  We often can become inspired and transformed by events via our emotions that we entwine into our experience.  Much of this effort should come from within ourselves.  How we translate these lessons into our lives can be an amazing occurrence, or it can be just another non-eventful happening and at worst will taint us and leave us jaded.  What we do to make our positive experience flourish within our lives is truly up to us.

How we connect with our world and allow it to transform us is unique to each one of us.  We are bound fundamentally by the same mechanisms, yet we all also are so diversely directed by its influence.  This is a huge revelation, because this shows that we do have control how this affects us, we are in charge of how we become motivated or discouraged by events that touch us.  When I suggest how events touch us, I truly mean touch us, as they influence more than just our intellect.  There is a deeper penetration of our nature that awakens a very primitive human connection to how we relate with the world.

It is more than intellectual, and includes part of our emotive factions, and what the ancients called our “spirited” factions of our being.  We often believe that we merely receive the world as it produces the content of our experience.  I think however that we create much of what we experience by how we conform to the content and context of our experience that the world provides.  Keep in mind that I am mixing much of the established rationalistic claims and the  empiricist claims of philosophy into my claim of epistemological knowledge.  Again the significance in our ability to discern contrast in our experience is crucial on how we interpret and integrate the events that form our lives.

The Buddha twice uses the simile of blind men led astray. In the Canki Sutta he describes a row of blind men holding on to each other as an example of those who follow an old text that has passed down from generation to generation.  In the Udana (68–69) he uses the elephant parable to describe sectarian quarrels. A king has the blind men of the capital brought to the palace, where an elephant is brought in and they are asked to describe it.

When the blind men had each felt a part of the elephant, the king went to each of them and said to each: ‘Well, blind man, have you seen the elephant? Tell me, what sort of thing is an elephant?’

The men assert the elephant is either like a pot (the blind man who felt the elephant’s head), a winnowing basket (ear), a plowshare (tusk), a plow (trunk), a granary (body), a pillar (foot), a mortar (back), a pestle (tail) or a brush (tip of the tail).

The men cannot agree with one another and come to blows over the question of what it is like and their dispute delights the king. The Buddha ends the story by comparing the blind men to preachers and scholars who are blind and ignorant and hold to their own views: “Just so are these preachers and scholars holding various views blind and unseeing…. In their ignorance they are by nature quarrelsome, wrangling, and disputatious, each maintaining reality is thus and thus.” The Buddha then speaks the following verse:

O how they cling and wrangle, some who claim
For preacher and monk the honored name!
For, quarreling, each to his view they cling.
Such folk see only one side of a thing.

This is the basis of our diversity and our abilities to synthesize the elemental experiences into our cognition’s.  We are bound to how we internalize these events in a myriad of ways.  Each one of us shapes much of our experience to very personal preferences that have an effect on the outcome of its meaning and its significance to us.  We ultimately decide how we embrace it or if we reject it.

Diary of a Stumbling Man

As I was walking down my very dark Pacific Beach neighborhood a few nights ago, I was suffering from a bad case of vertigo I happened to catch, this gave me difficulty walking in a straight line and coincidentally reminded me of an earlier time in my life.  It was a beautiful night, warm and somewhat quiet for a robust beach community with a dense population of young people.  It was bizarre, but a part of me enjoyed the effects of my vertigo during this walk.  I was walking to the local market to pick up a few things and If you were to see me from a distance it would probably seem that I was intoxicated as my walking ability was not normal.  On one occasion I stumbled onto the sidewalk corner onto my left arm and leg taking the most damage with a few scuff’s on my elbow and knee. If anything I wondered if anyone had seen me because if you were to view this event you would probably think how dumb I must have looked.  Yes even the ego becomes aware of any intrusions upon our waking silly life events.  Walking down those dark street corners in Pacific Beach reminding me of when I was much younger.  In years past when I was only seventeen years old I remember walking the streets of a quiet neighborhood after a high school party, I was trying to clear my head walking around the neighborhood.  In this case I was evidently drunk and probably had mixed other intoxicants during that night to make my experience even that more frustrating if you wanted to do basic functions of some sort.

In those early years I had never experienced this kind of behavior as my body was not accustomed to the intoxicating effects.  It was however very new and an unlikely learning experience I would never forget.  I do not encourage this type of behavior since I do not believe in altered states of consciousness produced by some drug induced state.  But it is indeed a new kind of experience that does give one new ways of looking at things.  It can possible give you an alternative way at problem solving since you have subdued your usual conscious mind approach to the world, and as much as it changes the way we look at things, it also likewise hinders our problem solving abilities as well. One can easily evoke the mid sixties era and how the Beatles changed the way we listened to music during that time.  The influence of their experimentation with the music due to the influences upon them during this time is very similar to the point I am trying to make.

As a psychology student I learned in my Physiological Psyche class that if you learn under the influence of (lets say caffeine),  you are likely to recall that information in a similar state of being, such that you would probably like to have caffeine in your system to recall what you had learned on earlier study sessions under the influence of caffeine.  One can easily extrapolate from this hypothesis to other kinds of agents that influence our thinking and our behaviors.  Think drinking intoxicants and trying to pick up dates at bars under these conditions, one may learn certain social skills that will inevitably help them in achieving their goal of capturing the attention of others.

Alcohol tends to diminish social fears, boosts ones awareness and limits inhibitions, and that may just be enough to capture the attention of others de facto under the influence of similar intoxicants.

Unfortunately many of my former school mates in high school were  predetorial using drink to subdue others under the influence rather than be proper gentlemen.  The maturity level is certainly crucial in the developing human being, as many rely upon devious means to make the sporting effect of adolescent charms and taking advantage of others under such conditions.  I was never like that, and I always could tell who one could trust when push came to shove.  I have never respected anyone who relied upon these techniques to gain upon their prey, and I protected several from any funny business which later spawned a nick name as a senior in high school, “the saint”.  I think maybe this was a kind of name that really looked down upon me rather than one of good fortune.  I inadvertently became the protector by disrupting the events to unfold when things got “out of hand”.  I only lectured on the side of when you wake up tomorrow, you will find yourself in total guilt that you had to use alcohol to achieve your goal.this only occurred by chance on only a few occasions.   To me you weren’t any good if you had to use alcohol, or other intoxicants, I was the advocate for being honest.  No other way was superior to this way, because it was the real test of being genuine.  I despised the pretentious.  There can be a lot of ego in high school and early adulthood, and I found very early on that I was not going to play by the rules of the conspicuous arrogant fools that treated others as if they were trifle amusements.

Ironically years later I was far from being “the saint”, as I too had my demons to chase but my true nature did always show, and I did have these memories that I am proud of.  It’s funny how on two completely different tangents of our lives can bring about fond memories on both sides of the spectrum of the life-cycle.  One of a middle-aged man, and the other that of a teen-aged young adult.

◉◉◉


Ringo Starr

“A lady that I know just came from Colombia. She laughed because I did not understand. She held out some marijuana uh-huh, said it was the finest in the land. I said, no-no-no-no, i dont smoke it no more. It only makes me fall on the floor.No thank you please, it only makes me sneeze, and then it makes it hard to find the door. A lady that i know just came from Morrocco, Spain. She laughed because i did not understand. She held out a ten-pound bag of cocaine, said it was the finest in the land. I said no-no-no-no, i don’t *sniff* no more, it only makes me fall on the floor. No thank you please, it only makes me sneeze, and then it makes it hard to find the door.
A lady that i know just came from Tennesee. She laughed because i did not understand. She held out a jug of moonshine, uh-huh, said it was the finest in the land. I said no-no-no-no, i don’t drink it no more, it only makes me fall on the floor. No thank you please, it only makes me sneeze, and then it makes it hard to find the door.Ringo Starr’s No-No Song”
Ringo Starr

Lundy Bancroft

“Alcohol does not a change a person’s fundamental value system. People’s personalities when intoxicated, even though somewhat altered, still bear some relationship to who they are when sober. When you are drunk you may behave in ways that are silly or embarrassing; you might be overly familiar or tactlessly honest, or perhaps careless or forgetful. But do you knock over little old ladies for a laugh? Probably not. Do you sexually assault the clerk at the convenience store? Unlikely. People’s conduct while intoxicated continues to be governed by their core foundation of beliefs and attitudes, even though there is some loosening of the structure. Alcohol encourages people to let loose what they have simmering below the surface.
ABUSERS MAKE CONSCIOUS CHOICES EVEN WHILE INTOXICATED”
Lundy Bancroft, Why Does He Do That?: Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men

Conflicted

Why do we dwell on an emotionally charged idea, or maybe why do we dismiss it altogether?  Have you thought about just how you have formed your ideas and beliefs about the world, and what just prevents us from dismissing the baggage we often collect?  Are we willing to question the foundations of our belief system when there is a conflict about what we’re told, and what we deem true?

The lack of having any external support group when you are feeling low is excruciatingly painful.  The strength to pick oneself up is much harder, when your internal voice has to operate without prejudice, when your internal voice diminishes your own internal criticisms that are weighing heavily upon you so that you may overcome the obstacles that you face.  Having conflicting conscious thoughts will always place you under scrutiny with your own judgments and this is sometimes a burden we do not freely share with others only to quietly suffer within our own creation of doubt.  But why must we anguish over these times of self-doubt?  Perhaps it is because we listen and acquire information from sources that give us a faulty valuation.  We’re taught to listen and respect our elders, the authority figures in our lives since they have benefited from their experience for more years than we have.  But I urge the reader to question authority since the argument is of a qualitative nature, and not one based on a quantitative accumulation of knowledge despite its inherent appeal to some.

If an internal struggle of conflicting feelings and thoughts that are remnants from adversarial external sources which have filtered into part of our thinking, then it may result as a troublesome cognition.  At a time of duress, we may give these critical token thoughts more weight than what is actually merited.  When we have contrary thoughts that disturb our resolve, we may lose focus on what is important and lose our bearings within the fog of ridicule.  If the diagnosis is a conflict that we ultimately control, and that we are the sole proprietors of our appraisals, then why does this seem to accommodate antagonism within our own minds?  Are we not in the best place to undertake a corrective direction in our thinking?  The answer could just be the way our thinking normally occurs.  How we process our information, and how we learn this information influences our decisions on how we also filter what we think we know and have come to believe.

How our thinking has evolved through-out our lives with a blending of experience, observation, rational, and emotional syntheses that have created and forged our thoughts and influenced our belief systems is commonly accepted as fact.  Some beliefs are conscious, and some operate on deeper levels we may not be consciously aware of.  I submit that we are creatures of habit, including our processes of reasoning.  Over time we form patterns of thought based on presuppositions about how we see the world.  Our patterns of thinking are much like a learned response directly correlated to the sympathetic nervous system.  The sympathetic nervous system is one of three major parts of the autonomic nervous system (the others being the enteric and parasympathetic systems).  Its general action is to mobilize the body’s nervous system fight-or-flight response.  It is, however, constantly active at a basic level to maintain homeostasis.  The homeostatic response to the world in our belief system may just operate at levels we do not question or lend ourselves to very often, hence the subconscious thoughts that drive many of our conscious thoughts bring about deeply felt concepts that influence us.  Whether we are to conclude self-doubt in times of conflict or conversely whether we are influenced on an alternate level is due to these presuppositions we rarely question.  They are the subroutines in our daily thoughts, the notions that lead us to make conclusions binding feeling and logic together that can change the way we see the world.  A convoluted fabric of thought, feeling and drives that work together to create a consistent view of what we observe that may at times disrupt our lives when conflicting notions enter into this process.

As children we develop a basis for meeting the world on how the world is presented to us.  Most children have a very natural way of experiencing the world, until they matriculate through the cultural pathways placing various lenses upon their scope to shape a reality largely based upon the teaching of their families.  Much of what is cultivated on pre-cognitive levels comes at a very early age, between birth and maybe six years of age.  The developmental stages of childhood maturation are still in development and not yet “hard-wired” at this age.  Our mental processes are forming from the examples given to us by our families and we build upon these foundations as we grow.  It is precisely some of these foundations that we no longer tap into and question.  They are the subroutines, the pre-cognitive staples that formulate some of our learned beliefs about the world.  They are very elusive since they are found in deeper structures within the brain, given the immense amount of neural pathways formed in childhood and developing until they lose their functionality.  The principles on which we form our ideas is largely influenced by these obscure percipient vestiges of thought.  We are seldom taught the skill to search deeper into our assumptions.  The contributions of Ludwig Wittgenstein in his philosophy of language are an invaluable insight on this topic when analytic philosophy is applied to our logic.

If these premises are sound, then where does that lead us?  Does this explain why hypnotic suggestion can displace deeper modes of thought we seldom have access to?  Why the importance of right thinking in the eightfold path is crucial for Buddhism?  Why the Zen use the Koan to disrupt the minds normative way of thinking?  Or perhaps why so many psychological personality disorders exist due to the formation of traumatized neural pathways during childhood?  Enneagram theory accounts for much of this due to its approach.   Again I ask, does this explain why we torture ourselves, being conflicted by ideas that we have only partial answers to, since much of the presumptions are buried deep within our minds?  I refer you to the work of Dr. Bruce Lipton for further analyses on this matter.  I highly recommend the work he has uncovered.

If the human experience is largely based on our ability to mediate its variables and problems, to arbitrate the ethical conditions that life brings us, then paying attention to what we conclude about our condition is preeminent.  Indeed, misjudgement is the cause for many mistaken paths we lead ourselves.  The purpose of trial and error, testing ourselves to the rigors of our decisions in everyday life is part of being human and also essential for our ability to learn through experience.  Learning that we must be mindful of our prejudices, that we must pay attention and heed to new information that may not be consistent with what we think we know is crucial to expanding our views.

Before you judge others or claim any absolute truth, consider that you can see less than 1% of the acoustic spectrum.  As you read this, you are traveling at 220 kilometers per second across the galaxy.  90% of the cells in your body carry their own microbial DNA and are not “you”.  The atoms in your body are 99.99999999999999% empty space and none of them are the ones you were born with, but they all originated in the belly of a star.  Human beings have 46 chromosomes, 2 less that the common potato.  The existence of the rainbow depends on the conical photoreceptors in your eyes; to animals without cones, the rainbow does not exist.  So you don’t just look at a rainbow, you create it.  This is pretty amazing, especially considering that all the beautiful colors you see represent less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum.

 

The earlier statements I’ve made about this paradigm of psychology are based on my studies.  I draw from many sources and fields to illustrate my views.